Saturday, February 28, 2015

Southern US Cities Preserve Civil Rights Heritage to Boost Tourism



VOAVideo: Southern US Cities Preserve Civil Rights Heritage to Boost Tourism

There has been a surge of interest in the American civil rights movement of the 1950s and '60s, thanks in part to the Hollywood motion picture "Selma." Five decades later, communities in the South are embracing the dark chapters of their past with hopes of luring tourism dollars. VOA's Chris Simkins reports. Originally published at - http://www.voanews.com/media/video/southern-cities-preserve-civil-rights-heritage-tourism/2662253.html

Thursday, February 26, 2015

U.S. Citizenship 25: Vocabulary Part 01


LearningChocolate: U.S. Citizenship 25: Vocabulary Part 01 http://goo.gl/jT6g1L

There are three parts of the USCIS Citizenship interview:

1) English Speaking/Listening: the applicant must orally answer question based on the N-400r Application for Naturalization.

2) Civics Test: the applicant must answer 6 out 10 questions correctly based on the USCIS 100 Civics/History questions.

3) Reading/Writing test: the USCIS officer will give the applicant 1 sentence to read, then will dictate an answer. The applicant must read and write 1 out 3 sentences correctly.

There is no official USCIS list of the reading/writing sentences BUT there is a official vocabulary list.

For more information about the Reading and Writing Vocabulary list for the U.S. Citizenship Test, go to http://goo.gl/9EMKTe

For more information about naturalization, go to the USCIS Citizenship Resource Center http://www.uscis.gov/citizenship

Study a little bit every day--I know you will be a great American citizen!

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

U.S. Citizenship 24: African-American History Part 3


uscitizenpod: U.S. Citizenship 24: African-American History Part 3 http://goo.gl/2ZOkP3

February is African-American History Month.
For more information, see http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/
For a list of the USCIS 100 History and Civics Questions, see http://goo.gl/lbeoGB
Thurgood Marshall was an important Civil Rights lawyer and was the first African-American to serve
as a US Supreme Court Associate Justice.
USCIS 100:40. Who is the Chief Justice of the United States now?
Congresswomen Shirley Chisolm (NY-12) and Barbara Jordan (TX-18) were the first African-American women
elected to the House of Representatives.
USCIS 100:23. Name your U.S. Representative.
Edward Brooke was the first African-American elected to the U.S. Senate after Reconstruction.
USCIS 100:20. Who is one of your state’s U.S. Senators now?*
Andrew Young served in many public offices, including ambassador to the United Nations.
USCIS 100:68. What is one thing Benjamin Franklin is famous for?
General Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice both served in the cabinet as Secretary of State.
USCIS 100:35. What does the President’s Cabinet do?
The current president is the first African-African elected to lead the United States.
USCIS 100:28. What is the name of the President of the United States now?*

Monday, February 23, 2015

U.S. Citizenship 23: African-American History Part 2




LearningChocolate: U.S. Citizenship 23: African-American History Part 2  http://goo.gl/00jSlN

February is African-American History Month.
For more information, see http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/
For a list of the USCIS 100 History and Civics Questions, see http://goo.gl/lbeoGB

The Civil Rights Movement fought for civil rights.
They tried to use peaceful(non-violent) methods to end racial discrimination and segregation.

The Little Rock 9 were the first African-Americans to go to an all white school in Little Rock, AK.
They encountered racial discrimination, but help to desegregate schools.
They fought for the civil right to go to good schools.
They fought for equality in education.

Rosa Parks refused to move from the WHITE (front) section to the BLACK (back) of the bus.
Her actions led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
African-Americans refused to ride segregated buses.
They fought for the civil right to use public transportation.
They fought for equality in public facilities.

African-American college students sat at lunch counters (restaurants inside department stores).
They refused to leave until they were served.
They fought for the civil right to be treated with respect.
They fought for equality as customers.

Martin Luther King, Jr led the March to Selma.
Although they were attacked, they refused to give up their First Amendment rights peacefully assemble and petition the government for their civil rights.
Their bravery led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act.
They fought for equality as citizens.

Malcolm X advocated self-reliance.
His autobiography talks about his change from a criminal to a man of peace.
His story inspires people to change and work for the community.
They fight for equality as neighbors.

USCIS 100:84. What movement tried to end racial discrimination?

USCIS 100:85. What did Martin Luther King, Jr. do?*

Sunday, February 22, 2015

U.S. Citizenship 22: African-American History Part 1


LearningChocolate: U.S. Citizenship 22: African-American History Part 1 http://goo.gl/TsPVgB

February is African-American History Month.
For more information, see http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/
For a list of the USCIS 100 History and Civics Questions, see http://goo.gl/lbeoGB

The first Africans came to America in 1629.
USCIS 100:60 What group of people was taken to America and sold as slaves?

The Boston Massacre began as a protest against British soldiers and ended in violence.
Crispus Attuks, and African-American man, was shot during the Boston Massacre.
He was one of the first people who died during the protest.
USCIS 100:61 Why did the colonists fight the British?

Harriet Tubman was a runaway slave.
She returned many times to the South to lead other slaves to freedom in the North.
USCIS 100:73. Name the U.S. war between the North and the South.

Sojourner Truth and Frederick Douglass were abolitionists.
They fought against slavery.
USCIS 100:74. Name one problem that led to the Civil War.

Abraham Lincoln was President of the United States, 1861-1865.
USCIS 100:75. What was one important thing that Abraham Lincoln did?*

Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan 1, 1863.
USCIS 100:76. What did the Emancipation Proclamation do?

Saturday, February 21, 2015

West Wing Week: 02/20/15 or, “Hello, ‘Chiberia!’”



wh.gov: West Wing Week: 02/20/15 or, “Hello, ‘Chiberia!’

Welcome to the West Wing Week, your guide to everything that’s happening at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. This week, the President spent time in sunny San Francisco and subzero Chicago, spoke at two different summits on two different coasts, and named three new national monuments. That’s February 13th to February 19th or, “Hello, ‘Chiberia!’

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Happy Lunar New Year!


Happy New Year from the students and staff of Milpitas Adult School!
Chúc Mừng Năm Mới     Gong Xi Fa Cai     Gong Hei Fat Choy!

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

News Words: Undocumented Workers




VOA Learning English: News Words: Undocumented Workers

Have you hear these words in a news story? They are at the heart of the immigration debate in the country. See how it is used in a news story. And please tell us what you think in the comments section below.

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

US Celebrates Presidents' Day Holiday


VOANews: US Celebrates Presidents' Day Holiday
Monday is Presidents' Day in the U.S. It first became a federal holiday in 1879 to celebrate the February 22 birthday of George Washington, the first U.S. president


VOANews: Washington’s Birthday or President’s Day–What’s In a Name? « All About America 
Neither of Washington’s birth dates – February 11 nor February 22 – will ever fall on the third Monday in February. So George Washington’s Birthday is never really George Washington’s birthday.

VOA Learning English News: Washington Has Three Birthdays and Other Presidential Fun Facts
Americans honor the first president, George Washington, in February. But the day the United States government calls George Washington's Birthday is not really his birthday. Some states consider the holiday a time to remember other past presidents, too. How much do you know about American leaders? More
Download (right-click or option-click and save)






Sunday, February 15, 2015

Happy Susan B. Anthony Day!

USCIS 100:77. What did Susan B. Anthony do?


Susan B. Anthony, 1820-1906: She Led the Fight to Gain Equal Rights for Women, Including the Right to Vote

ISusan B. Anthony was born in Massachusetts on February 15, 1820. She is known for campaigning for the right of women to vote. She spoke out publicly against slavery and for equal treatment of women in the workplace.

In 1920, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution gave women the right to vote. Susan B. Anthony died 14 years before the adoption of the 19th Amendment, but it was still widely known as the Susan B. Anthony Amendment.

In 1979, she became the first woman whose image appeared on a circulating U.S. coin. The coin is called the Susan B. Anthony dollar and is worth one dollar. (source: USCIS M-638)

See also:

USCIS 100:77. What did Susan B. Anthony do?
          ▪ fought for women’s rights
          ▪ fought for civil rights

Friday, February 13, 2015

West Wing Week: 02/13/15 or, “Just Say the Word”



wh.gov: West Wing Week: 02/13/15 or, “Just Say the Word”

Welcome to the West Wing Week, your guide to everything that's happening at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, and beyond. This week, the President spent time with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Hoosiers, BuzzFeeders, veterans, and public health warriors -- while the Vice President traveled to Belgium and Germany. That's February 6th to February 12th or, "Just Say the Word."

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Red Hand Day

Red Hand Day Poster by Kapalsky

Red Hand Day, February 12 each year, is an annual commemoration day on which people draw attention to the fates of child soldiers, children who are forced to serve as soldiers in wars and armed conflicts. The aim of Red Hand Day is to call for action against this practice, and support for children. To learn more, go to RedHandDay.org

N-400r Part 11 excerpt:

  20  Have you ever forced a child (under 15) to become a soldier?

  21  Have you ever forced a child (under 15) to help soldiers?


For more practice, see:

Sunday, February 8, 2015

More US Cities Offering IDs to Undocumented Immigrants



VOAVideo: More US Cities Offering IDs to Undocumented Immigrants

Immigration reform is a hotly debated issue in Washington, but many U.S. cities aren't waiting for the federal government to determine how to deal who with those who entered the country illegally. Daniela Schrier reports on New York’s newly unveiled municipal ID cards that are available to all city residents — including undocumented immigrants.
Originally published at http://www.voanews.com/media/video/more-cities-identification-cards-undocumented-immigrants/2632343.html

Saturday, February 7, 2015

West Wing Week: 02/06/15 or, "To All the DREAMers"



wh.gov West Wing Week: 02/06/15 or, "To All the DREAMers"

Welcome to the West Wing Week, your guide to everything that’s happening at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. This week, the President spent time with Scientists, Letter Writers, Homeland Security Staffers, Immigration, Healthcare and Education Advocates, Spiritual Leaders, Athletes, and DREAMers. That’s January 30th to February 5th or, "To All the DREAMers."

Thursday, February 5, 2015

USPS: BLACK HERITAGE Stamp Series

USPS: BLACK HERITAGE Stamp Series

African-American leaders, inventors, activists, sports figures, and culture-shapers whose lives changed history.

February is African-American History Month!

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

USCIS Podcasts for Citizenship Teachers and Volunteers

USCIS Podcasts http://goo.gl/Zzh0I8

Audio Icon
Michael Jones, USCIS Office of Citizenship
A discussion of interrogative pronouns and how to help students prepare for the reading portion of the naturalization test.
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Michael Jones, USCIS Office of Citizenship
A discussion on the use of dictation practice to help students prepare for the writing portion of the naturalization test.
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Rachael Shaw, USCIS Office of Citizenship
A discussion of building vocabulary to help students prepare for the naturalization interview and test.
Audio Icon
Paul Kim, USCIS Office of Citizenship
A discussion of using sentence structure to build comprehension and confidence and how to help students prepare for the civics portion of the naturalization test.

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Jefferson's Library Continues to Impress, 200 Years Later

USCIS 100:62. Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?



VOAVideo: Jefferson's Library Continues to Impress, 200 Years Later

Two hundred years after the U.S. Congress purchased a huge collection of books belonging to former President Thomas Jefferson, it remains one of America’s greatest literal treasures and has become the centerpiece of Washington’s Library of Congress. VOA’s Deborah Block reports.
Originally published at -http://www.voanews.com/media/video/jefferson-library-continues-impress-two-hundred-years-later/2622491.html

USCIS 100:62. Who wrote the Declaration of Independence?

▪ (Thomas) Jefferson

Monday, February 2, 2015

Happy African-American History Month from uscitizenpod

Happy African-American History Month! During the month of February, US Citizenship Podcast explores the connection between the USCIS History and Government questions and African American History. Let's get started!


2014: 15 USCIS Civics Questions in Honor of African-American History Month.

**2015 test in honor of African-American History will be posted later this month--stay tuned!
PLUS:

Sunday, February 1, 2015

ESL Podcast 1073 – Seeking Asylum

ESL Podcast 1073 – Seeking Asylum 

What happens if living in your own country is no longer safe? Find out in this episode.  
Download Podcast 

In the Learning Guide: Get a full transcript (written version of every word you hear), vocabulary list and sample sentences, and comprehension questions.

In “What Else Does it Mean,” learn the other meanings of “urge” and “to follow-through.”
In the “Culture Note,” learn about “Extradition Treaties.”

“‘Extradition’ is the process of one country transferring a ‘criminal’ (a person who has committed a crime and broken the law)…” – READ MORE in the Learning Guide


VOCABULARY

  • out to get me
  • freedom
  • monitored
  • seek asylum
  • refugee
  • persecuted
  • extreme
  • religious beliefs
  • to emigrate
  • urge
  • resettlement
  • to renounce my citizenship
  • letting off steam
  • follow-through
  • courage of your convictions
  • to man up